All Things Bright and Beautiful LYRICS WORDS BEST TOP POPULAR FAVORITE TRENDING SING ALONG SONGS

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All Things Bright and Beautiful is an Anglican hymn, also popular with other Christian denominations. The words are by Cecil Frances Alexander and were first published in her Hymns for Little Children.

The piece can be sung to several melodies, in particular the 17th-century English melody “Royal Oak”, adapted by Martin Shaw, and “All Things Bright and Beautiful” by William Henry Monk. There have also been other adaptations, such as a full choral piece by John Rutter. In earlier editions of the Church of Scotland’s Church Hymnary, the tunes “God in Nature” by John Stainer and “All Things Bright” by Frederick Arthur Gore Ouseley had been used.

The hymn was first published in 1848 in Mrs Cecil Alexander’s Hymns for Little Children. It consists of a series of stanzas that elaborate upon verses of the Apostles’ Creed. It may have been inspired by Psalm 104, verses 24 and 25: “Oh Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches. So is this great and wide sea, wherein are things creeping innumerable, both small and great beasts”. The hymn may have been inspired as well by a verse from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner: “He prayeth best, who loveth best; All things great and small; For the dear God who loveth us; He made and loveth all.” Alternatively, inspiration may have come from William Paley’s Natural Theology, published in 1802, that argues for God as the designer of the natural world. For example, the hymn’s second verse alludes to “wings” and verse 7 refers to “eyes”. Paley cited wings and eyes as examples of complexity of design, analogous to that of a watch, with God as the Divine Watchmaker.

Alexander’s composition of the hymn’s text has been attributed to three locations: Llanwenarth House in Govilon, Monmouthshire – the refrain “The purple headed mountains, The river running by” possibly referring to the Sugar Loaf and Blorenge mountains and to the River Usk; Markree Castle near Sligo, and Minehead and the nearby village of Dunster in 1848, in which case the “purple headed mountain” might refer to Grabbist Hill and the river to the River Avill.

The second line was used as the title to James Herriot’s book All Creatures Great and Small, which was centred around a veterinarian practice in 1930s Yorkshire in Northern England. Subsequently it became the title of the film and television series. Later Herriot used the rest of the lines of the refrain for the books that followed: All Things Bright and Beautiful, All Things Wise and

All things bright and beautiful,
all creatures great and small,
all things wise and wonderful:
the Lord God made them all.
1. Each little flower that opens,
each little bird that sings,
God made their glowing colors,
and made their tiny wings.

All things bright and beautiful,
all creatures great and small,
all things wise and wonderful:
the Lord God made them all.

VIDEO AND Vocals/Instrumentals COPYRIGHT (c) 2018
by CHARLES ELMER SZABO, BMI

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